Episode 4: Wraparound, Episodes 1-3.

In this installment, Steve and Kathleen chat with each other about what they’re reading and who they’re wearing. They also reflect on the three interviews they’ve done so far, finding a set of serendipitous commonalities that also correspond to the idea behind Indoor Voices. They did so at the LaGuardia Community College recording studio where they foresee having future wraparounds, so we all have something to look forward to.

Be sure to enjoy the soothing buzzing of Steve’s phone vibrating during the interview, perhaps pushing out the jackhammers in Barbara Katz Rothman’s interview as the most distracting sound in an episode…

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Episode 3: “Corralling scholarly cats…”

As a librarian, there are certain issues, like open access, that I feel I have a pretty firm grip on. When I read Jessie Daniels and Polly Thistlethwaite’s Being a Scholar in the Digital Era: Transforming Scholarly Practice for the Public Good, I knew it would be good, but I didn’t expect many surprises. But the book blew me away in terms of the fantastically interesting takes on what matters to academics—not necessarily to academia—in the 21st century.

This interview, which took place in LaGuardia Community College’s lovely podcast studio, touches on a lot of those issues, but also the fixes for some of the challenges of digital scholarship, such as the tension between wanting to reach a broader audience with your work while also being intimidated by the repercussions of the work being misunderstood.

Episode 2: A Pas de Deux*: Two Social Movemements

I had the pleasure of a relaxed yet stimulating conversation with Barbara Katz Rothman about her book, A Bun in the Oven: How the Food and Birth Movements Resist Industrialization. In the spirit of resistance, rather than recording in the confines of an institution, we met in Barbara’s NYC apartment, replete with the ambient sounds of traffic and jackhammering in the distance. Earbuds or headphones are recommended for the full effect.

There are several ways to summarize the complexities that Barbara delves into in her book, but I especially like this quote from deep within chapter 9 which gets to a part of the heart of it: “​That tension between larger social systems and individual choices is the grand philosophical question of all time, the issue of free will. And it is the focus of the sociological imagination – how much of what is experienced as so deeply personal is actually structural.”

Enjoy the interview – AND the book!

* Listen in to hear BKR discuss the significance of Frenchness.

 

Episode 1: “A sociologist walks into a bar…”

Masters of Craft book cover

Here is the first installment of what we hope will be many more conversations coming your way.

The title of this post is lifted from the Wall Street Journal review of Richard’s book by William L. Hamilton. It was too good not to reuse.

Before you listen to my interview with Richard Ocejo, why not take a moment to listen to him sum up his book here?

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Done? OK, then you’re ready for the interview. Enjoy!